occupt:

Know Your Enemy

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42 minutes ago 23,859 notes
20th
October
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pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “Death Card”

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “Death Card”

1 hour ago 840 notes

sequentialsmart:

Asterios Polyp, by David Mazzucchelli.

(via spx)

1 hour ago 49 notes

laughingsquid:

Modern Teens React to and Try on 1980s Fashion

2 hours ago 75 notes

Poor kids who do everything right don't do better than rich kids who do everything wrong | Washington Post

socialismartnature:

America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others.

That’s because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on “enrichment activities” for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.

But, of course, it’s not just a matter of dollars and cents. It’s also a matter of letters and words. Affluent parents talk to their kids three more hours a week on average than poor parents, which is critical during a child’s formative early years. That’s why, as Stanford professor Sean Reardon explains, “rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students,” and they’re staying that way.

It’s an educational arms race that’s leaving many kids far, far behind.

It’s depressing, but not nearly so much as this:

Even poor kids who do everything right don’t do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong. Advantages and disadvantages, in other words, tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see that in the above chart, based on a new paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s annual conference, which is underway.

Specifically, rich high school dropouts remain in the top about as much as poor college grads stay stuck in the bottom — 14 versus 16 percent, respectively. Not only that, but these low-income strivers are just as likely to end up in the bottom as these wealthy ne’er-do-wells. Some meritocracy.

What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.

But even if they didn’t, low-income kids would still have a hard time getting ahead. That’s, in part, because they’re targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects. And even if they do get a good degree, at least when it comes to black families, they’re more likely to still live in impoverished neighborhoods that keep them disconnected from opportunities.

It’s not quite a heads-I-win, tails-you-lose game where rich kids get better educations, yet still get ahead even if they don’t—but it’s close enough. And if it keeps up, the American Dream will be just that.

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2 hours ago

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3 hours ago 4,845 notes

mr-mononucleosis:

lunalovegouda:

The intro cards for Futurama have always been one of my favorite parts of the show because people always talk about the old Simpson’s couch gag but this is just pure gold… I mean-

It goes from everything from 

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and then they made fun of how much everyone reacted to the the infamous ‘dead dog episode’ that I cried about…

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And then one time when the show got canceled…

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and then when it came back..

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you’re missing my favorite one though

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(via akaiengarde)

3 hours ago 218,497 notes

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

(via akaiengarde)

3 hours ago 33,197 notes

"Your privilege is comprised of the questions you’ve never had to ask."

-

Catherynne Valente

Important for ALL of us to consider.

(via fuck-yeah-feminist)

(via goforthandagitate)

3 hours ago 18,475 notes

Society for Cutting Up Men Manifesto

taught this today, to a bunch of high school seniors. Don’t tell anyone…

6 hours ago

"He who jumps into the void owes no explanation to those who stand and watch."

- Jean Luc Godard (via memoriastoica)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

6 hours ago 22,675 notes

vulpesvulpesvulpes:

Excerpt from upcoming tour comic with Nicole Rodrigues, “I’m On My Way”

6 hours ago 3 notes
20th
October
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The Forest Spirit, god of life and death

The Forest Spirit, god of life and death

(via hayaomiyazakicartoon)

6 hours ago 30,038 notes
20th
October
56 notes
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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

October 20, 2011: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is brutally tortured and murdered by counter-revolutionaries and imperialists during illegal NATO airstrikes.
We do not forget! We do not forgive!
Gadhafi lynched by U.S./NATO

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

October 20, 2011: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is brutally tortured and murdered by counter-revolutionaries and imperialists during illegal NATO airstrikes.

We do not forget! We do not forgive!

Gadhafi lynched by U.S./NATO

6 hours ago 56 notes